Saturday, 23 January 2010

The mate in 1

I was doing some research recently for some coaching material, and I came across the following strange game. While everything up to move 18 or so looked ok (from 19th century standards) the game came to a sudden conclusion on move 20 when White played a move that allowed a mate in 1. And it wasn't a case of missing the threat and failing to prevent it (eg Kramnik v Deep Fritz), but actually playing a move that allowed the mate. Now given the reputation of the players involved, I'm wondering if anything similar has occurred in top level modern chess.

Kieseritzky,Lionel - Anderssen,Adolf [B20]
London knockout London (1.1), 27.05.1851

1.e4 c5 2.b3 Nc6 3.Bb2 a6 4.a4 e6 5.Nf3 d6 6.Nc3 Nf6 7.Be2 Be7 8.0-0 0-0 9.d4 cxd4 10.Nxd4 Qb6 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.a5 Qc7 13.f4 Ne8 14.Bd3 f5 15.exf5 exf5 16.Qh5 Nf6 17.Qh3 Ng4 18.Rf3 Qa7+ 19.Kf1 Rf6 (D)
20.Rg3 Qf2#

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

One game where this occurred was Rogers-Korchnoi.

Anonymous said...

Hi there!
I would like to burn a theme at here. There is such a thing, called HYIP, or High Yield Investment Program. It reminds of ponzy-like structure, but in rare cases one may happen to meet a company that really pays up to 2% daily not on invested money, but from real profits.

For quite a long time, I make money with the help of these programs.
I don't have problems with money now, but there are heights that must be conquered . I make 2G daily, and my first investment was 500 dollars only.
Right now, I managed to catch a guaranteed variant to make a sharp rise . Turn to my web site to get additional info.

http://theinvestblog.com [url=http://theinvestblog.com]Online Investment Blog[/url]

Ako's note said...

nice!
but how we can avoid such a mistake?

i read your weblog every day, and i enjoy it, keep writing

TrueFiendish said...

The scheme mentioned must truly be amazing. How else could someone with such minimal language skills make two grand a day! It really is quite something. :)

Kevin Bonham said...

In Beliavsky - Johannessen Linares 2002 Beliavsky moved his king into #1 in a queen ending. He gained extra points for grace and artistry from the judges on account of the following: he wasn't losing, his king was not in check and the king move in question was the only move on the board allowing #1

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1329014